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Health Forum    Infectious Diseases
Health Discussion Forum

 HELP!!! My father tested HIV Positive and WESTLOB Negative!!! WHat does that mean?
he says that's all he knows what does that mean? he said that's what he read on his file in a federal prison!...


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???
Im real considered they might fill with alotr of ...


 Can Diarrhea be contagious?

Additional Details
Don't answer the question with a question....


 How do we get tapeworms??
please include websites or resources if u can!!!!...


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Tell me the process not simply that by having copulation or by blood ...


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 I have been exposed to a person with tuberculosis meningitis,how will i avoid contacting the disease?
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 Should someone be worried about HIV when making out?
Dont tell me "Oh uhhh yeah if u have a cut and he has a cut then yeah."

Just friken answer the question

Should someone be worried about HIV when making out?

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 What happended to Bird Flu?
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 We just found out in our town that we have high amounts of e-coli in our water. I am pregnant so should i be?
worried about my baby?
Additional Details
i have been drinking a gallon of it a day for awhile now. they told us we are even to brush our teeth or take a ...


 Bright yellow stool urinary track infection???help?
I was recently told that I have a uti.
but have had bright yellow, almost high lighter -yellow like stool, (for the past 2-3 weeks)
is it normal to have that color stool until the uti ...


 Why do u think that curing hiv is important?
ofcourse it is important but why do YOU think it should be cured.
Additional Details
well ya a part of my question was also many other diseases like malaria and other infectious diseases ...


 Is flatulence contagious ?
...



Ashley
Can you get Lyme Disease from eating an infected deer?
My boyfriend and I are interested in hunting in an area where Lyme Disease is very prevalent and would like to be able to eat the deer meat. Will we be okay as long as the meat is cooked well?
                     





momalleyray
Rating
no don't be gross you can get really sick go somewhere else call the state troper they will tell you


larkinfan11
Rating
It's pretty well documented in microbiological literature that B. burgdorferi can't tolerate high temperatures. So as long as you cook the meat well and take the proper precautions, listed elsewhere in this post, to protect yourself against against the ticks when you're outside, you'll be fine. Also, food isn't a known vector of the disease. The optimum pH of the B. burgdorferi is around that of the body (7.4) so it definitely wouldn't survive in the acidic pH of the stomach (2).

I do have to kind of chuckle at those that say that deer aren't a vector for Lyme disease. How exactly do you think these ticks become infected with the disease? They certainly aren't born with it. It is contracted from a host animal. Deer are known to be carriers of the disease.


voodewchile
Don't eat diseased deer. That's just wrong. Eat deer that has been killed during deer season also.


shetried
As long as you cook the meat well, you shouldn't have a problem. As someone else pointed out, you are more at risk from the tick-infested environment than you are from eating the venison.

Even if you ate your venison raw, no one knows whether the Lyme spirochete could survive the acid conditions of the stomach and go on to infect you. Lyme spirochetes are quite particular about their culture medium, so it may be none would survive anyway.

Be sure to use precautions in the woods: apply DEET to your skin and a spray with Permethrin on your clothing, and do frequent tick inspections. Continue to check for ticks for several days after exposure; ticks you might miss the first day, you might see on subsequent days.

Remove any biting ticks properly.

If a tick bites you and has been attached for a while, consider getting prophylactic treatment. Antibiotics are quite safe, while Lyme disease can be very nasty. See www.ilads.org - the Burrascano treatment guidelines - for information on prophylactic treatment.

Avoid sitting on logs or leaning up against trees, at least in California where nymphal ticks are frequently found on the tops of downed logs, especially in areas with deciduous trees, and on the mossy north sides of tree trunks. Wood gathering has been associated with increased risk of acquiring Lyme disease.

J Med Entomol. 2004 Mar;41(2):239-48. Links
Human behaviors elevating exposure to Ixodes pacificus (Acari: Ixodidae) nymphs and their associated bacterial zoonotic agents in a hardwood forest.

* Lane RS,
* Steinlein DB,
* Mun J.

Division of Insect Biology, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.

Epidemiological evidence suggests that the nymph of the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus Cooley and Kohls, is the primary vector of the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi Johnson, Schmid, Hyde, Steigerwalt, and Brenner, to humans in northwestern California. In spring 2002, six different human behaviors were evaluated as potential risk factors for acquiring I. pacificus nymphs in a deciduous woodland in Mendocino County, California. Also, the prevalence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) and the causative agents of human granulocytic (Anaplasma phagocytophilum [Foggie] Dumler, Barbet, Bekker, Dasch, Palmer, Ray, Rikihisa, and Rurangirwa) and monocytic ehrlichioses (Ehrlichia chaffeensis Anderson, Dawson, Jones, and Wilson) was determined in nymphs that had been collected from subjects or by dragging leaf litter. Activities involving a considerable degree of contact with wood resulted in greater acquisition of nymphs than those involving exposure solely to leaf litter. Time-adjusted tick-acquisition rates demonstrated that sitting on logs was the riskiest behavior, followed, in descending rank, by gathering wood, sitting against trees, walking, stirring and sitting on leaf litter, and just sitting on leaf litter. The number of ticks acquired appeared to be unrelated to the type of footwear worn (hiking boots, hiking sandals, or running shoes). Overall, 3.4% (n = 234) of the nymphs were infected with A. phagocytophilum, 3.9% (n = 181) with B. burgdorferi s.l., and none (n = 234) with E. chaffeensis. Of 13 nymphs infected with either A. phagocytophilum or B. burgdorferi s.l., 2 (15.4%) were coinfected with both bacteria, as were 1.3% of 158 nymphs obtained from leaf litter, the first report of coinfection in this life stage of I. pacificus. Four unattached, infected nymphs were removed from subjects, including two acquired while sitting on logs that contained A. phagocytophilum, another with the same bacterium obtained while walking, and one acquired while gathering wood that was infected with B. burgdorferi s.l. Despite the use of extreme personal preventive measures by both subjects, two attached, uninfected nymphs were removed from one of them > or = 1-2 d postexposure. The public health implications of these findings are discussed.

PMID: 15061284 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


Daniel F
Rating
you would need to be bitten by the ticks on the deer and in the woods...


kris d
omg are all you people stupid?!?!?!?...she is askin a simplw question...well its very unlikely that a deer will be carrying the disease. but if for a chance you do ed up with one, you will most likely notice that its unhealthy. when you go register it they look it over to see if thier anything noticeable. but if even that don't work as long as the meet is cooked you'll be fine anyways...i live in wisconsin where cwd is a big deal. i researched this stuff for about a year because i'm a regular hunter...hope it helps


TweetyBird
Rating
"michele" and "kris d" are the only ones who answered with any degree of intelligence and knowledge. To the bleeding heart who says killing deer is wrong: it's because of humans that deer have to be hunted at all. Enjoy your hunting trip and take appropriate precautions.


John b
their is no way you can get it from eating venison, you are doing the right thing by harvesting the animal, despite the negative input by many who have no idea or clue on how the forest replenishes itself with wildlife,I'm in orange county new york and many places that once was fit for hunting is now sold out to developers who loaded the area with homes, sold to many who disliked hunting THE BIGGEST WILDLIFE KILLERS


michele
No.

Deer are a dead-end tick vector. Although lyme-carrying ticks feed on deer, the deer themselves do not become infected.

p.s. If you plan to hunt in a Lyme endemic area, be ABSOULTELY SURE to protect yourself adequately. A great hunting trip is not worth a lifetime of struggling with Lyme or other tick borne diseases.


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